Linguaculture, volume 1, number 1, 2010

 TABLE OF CONTENTS

Copyright

ON LANGUAGE VARIATION AND VARIETIES

Christina Bismark
Albert-Ludwigs University Freiburg, Germany

Abstract & Keywords

The occurrence of the verbal ending -s with non-3 rd person singular subjects is a frequent phenomenon in varieties of English worldwide. It has been attested to fulfil a wide range of functions in addition to its Standard English use as a person-number marker. This paper is to characterize the various factors which condition the use of non- standard verbal -s. It will discuss their areal distribution and give an account of the frequency with which each of the conditioning factors is attested. Based on this characterization, a group of core constraints will be isolated, the specific character of which will be shown to have facilitated their stability, endurance and spread.
Keywords: subject-verb agreement, verbal -s, non-standard varieties, constraint, Northern Subject Rule, regularization
 
Daniela Kolbe and Andrea Sand
Albert-Ludwigs University Freiburg, Germany

Abstract & Keywords

The inversion of (auxiliary) verb and subject in subordinate interrogative clauses (embedded inversion, or EI) is a feature that occurs in many non-standard varieties of English, especially in varieties that have developed in language contact situations, such as Irish English, East African English or Indian English. Various sources of origin have been proposed in previous research, among them substrate influence or transfer errors of learners in language contact situation. This paper introduces the phenomenon in question and provides an overview of previous research. Drawing on data of the International Corpus of English (ICE), it then presents the results of probabilistic statistic analyses (logistic regression) in order to identify which external and internal factors are strongest in eliciting the inverted word order.

Keywords: syntax, non-standard syntax, worldwide varieties of English, reported speech, indirect questions, inversion
 
Patricia Ronan
University of Lausanne, Switzerland

Abstract & Keywords

This article examines the category of present habitual in Irish English, Irish and Scots Gaelic. The latter two are frequently claimed to have had an influence on the development of the tense and aspect systems of their respective contact varieties of English. It is argued that Scots Gaelic, in contrast to Irish Gaelic, has no separately marked habitual present system, and therefore there may have been less pressure to introduce distinct habitual-present aspect into Scottish English, an assessment which is in line with research in contact linguistics.
Keywords: (Linguistic) Aspect, Present-Habitual, Language Contact, Irish-English, Irish Gaelic, Scots Gaelic
 
Madalina Chitez
Albert-Ludwigs University Freiburg, Germany

Abstract & Keywords

The focus of the article is the dialectal-typological analysis of Perfect Simple/PS (Ro. 'perfectul simplu') in Romanian dialects, i.e. Bobice ş ti/Olt/Wallachia and Alma ş /Arad/Transylvania. Paralleled by the main literature-based characteristics of the tense, the data do not only emphasize the surprisingly preponderant distribution of PS in Transylvania but they also reveal the key status of the Perfect Simple as part of the Romanian dialect use as well as its typologically relevant double status (Standard Romanian versus dialect use). The comparison between the 'general purpose' Latin-to- Romance PS evolution and the 'Balkansprachbund' Greek-Aorist characteristics ends with commentaries on the double perspective of Romanian: Wallachian (generally reflected in Standard Romanian) manifests Balkan-oriented phenomena and Transylvanian preserves Latin/Romance-oriented features.

Keywords: dialectology, typology, dialect syntax, dialectal typology, Romanian dialects, Perfect Simple, perfectul simplu (Ro.), Balkansprachbund, Standard Average European

 
TERMINOLOGY AND TERMINOLOGY MANAGEMENT NOTES
 
Daniela Doboş
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania

Abstract & Keywords

Our "Knowledge Society" is justification enough for the great interest allotted to scientific and technical neology, as examples of lexical creativity. The paper discusses Chomsky's argument concerning the two forms of understanding pertaining to science and common sense and the chief means of scientific neology, with comments centered on the medical vocabulary as well as on Darwin's Origin of Species. In guise of conclusions, a few questions which seem to me relevant at the beginning of the new century and millennium.

Keywords: compounds; information; metaphor; nouns; terms
 
Teodora Ghivirigă
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania

Abstract & Keywords

In The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money (1936), Keynes lays the foundations of what is today known as macroeconomics; trying to establish the causes of unemployment and inflation, he introduces a set of terms related to saving, consumption and investment: marginal propensity to consumption, marginal propensity to spend, propensity to liquidities, propensity to savings. His book was translated into Romanian in 1970, although the basic terms pertaining to Keynesianism had already been disseminated via courses in the history of economic ideas. The present paper assesses the way in which Keynesian terminology has been translated into Romanian: hesitations, overlaps can be identified (e.g. both motives and incentives are rendered as mobiluri; however, the major concern is the incongruity related to the terms inducement and propensity, both translated into Romanian as înclinaţie). It also attempts to offer a possible explanation of this incongruity for the Romanian terminology of economics.

Keywords: terminology, Keynesian theory, primary term creation, translation
 
Nancy Matis
freelance translator

Abstract & Keywords

This article briefly presents an overview of the author's experience regarding the way terminology is managed during translation projects, mainly in the technical and IT sectors. The purpose of the article is not to provide a cookbook on terminology management but rather to analyse some behaviours and reactions regarding this subject and to give some hints on key points linked to terminology in translation.

Keywords: terminology, translation, revision, terminologist, translator, reviewer, translation company, terminologists, translators, reviewers, translation companies, terminology database, terminology databases, source term, target term, terms, terminology management, translation project, translation projects, glossary, glossaries, Style Guide, Translation Style Guide, Style Guides, Translation Style Guides, Multiterm, SDL Multiterm, Computer-Aided tool, Computer-Aided tools, CAT, CAT tool, CAT tools, translation memory, translation memories, translator forums
 
INTERVIEW
 
Rodica Albu
 
BOOK REVIEWS AND BOOK NOTES
 
Rodica Albu
Antoinette Renouf and Andrew Kehoe (eds.). Corpus Linguistics: Refinements and Reassessments (p. 125)
 
Teodora Ghivirgă