Linguaculture, Volume 7, Number 1, 2016

ADAPTATION
Issue Editors: Laurence Raw and Veronica Popescu
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
Laurence Raw
 
Christopher Wydler
Texas A&M University-Commerce, USA

Abstract & Keywords

Scholarship on panopticism and film rarely considers aesthetic attributes of the medium. Thematic  elements  associated  with panopticism  are  often  examined  instead. George Lucas’ directorial debut, THX 1138 (1971), uses aesthetic values in filmmaking to screen a narrative  grounded  in  panopticism. By  drawing  on  the  Foucaultian  principle  of panopticism,  this  article  illustrates  the  ideological  confliction  between  labor  and  love that  is  central  to  the  protagonist  THX. On  the  surface, THX 1138  situates  the  sexual ideologies  of  the  early  Seventies  in  a  socialist  contention.  The  sexual  ideology  that favors  love  and  freedom  of  expression  is  placed  in  direct  conflict  with  a  socialist ideology of labor and obedience. This ideological strife erupts on screen in a dystopian future that is visualized in panoptic cinematography techniques. The result is an analysis of  the  nuanced  visual  mastery on Lucas’s part that serves as an explicit commentary grounded  in  the  political  and  cultural  contention  never  quite  resolved  in  American history.
Keywords: THX 1138, panopticism, panoptic gaze, cinematography
 
Allen H. Redmon
Texas A&M University Central Texas, USA

Abstract & Keywords

Each episode of Noah Hawley’s first two seasons of Fargo begins with the same claim: “this is a true story.” The claim might invite the formation of what Thomas Leitch (2007) calls a “privileged master text,” except that Hawley undermines the creation of such a text in at least two ways. On the one hand, Hawley uses his truth claim as a way to direct his audience into the film he is adapting – Joel and Ethan Coen’s (1996) film by the same name. Hawley ensures throughout his first season that those who know or who come-to-know the Coens’ work will recognize his story as an extension of the Coens’s world. Hawley references the Coens’ world so much that his audience is never entirely outside the Coens’ universe, and certainly not in any world a story based on a true event might pretend to occupy. At the same time, Hawley allows different speakers to make the opening truth claim by the end of his second season, which further prevents his truth assertion from locating viewers in any actual world. Hawley’s second move reveals that true stories are always subjective stories, which means they are always constructed stories. In this way, a true story is no more definitive than any other story. All stories are, in keeping with Jorge Luis Borges’ attitude toward definitive texts, only a draft or a version of a story. Every telling invites another, alternative retelling. A true story is, therefore, above all a story.
Keywords: true stories, adaptation, Coen Brothers, Fargo, subjectivity, constructivism
 
Betty Latham
Texas A&M University Central Texas, USA

Abstract & Keywords

Once something becomes a story and it is appropriated in some way, that story experiences an additional, altered life. The adaptation might echo the original, but it does so in such a way that the original is forever changed. The original becomes a “changeling.” On a personal level we view events that we have “witnessed” through the lens of our own experiences. This is even true when one revisits the past through fiction. The reader or spectator experiences the past through the lens of the adapter. Stephen King admitted to being emotionally invested in the events surrounding the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy in 1963, and this emotional investment is reflected in his adaptation. Stephen King’s novel, 11-22-63, and its TV adaptation, serve as compelling examples of how emotional responses to the past can inform their adaptations, alter how their audiences explore and re-visit the past, and demonstrate how history and adaptations become changelings.  King’s adaptation additionally demonstrates his ability to integrate the Kennedy assassination back into popular culture, inviting and allowing a “new” younger audience (who were not alive at the time of the assassination) to “experience” history by accompanying his characters down the rabbit hole of history.
Keywords: adaptation, appropriation, film and history, emotional response, popular culture
 
Laurence Raw
Başkent University, Ankara, Turkey

Abstract & Keywords

Based on a transformational moment in 2013, this piece calls for a revision in research methods, with the attention focused less on critical objects and more on one’s personal response to them. This technique of mesearch, with the self placed at the center of one’s agenda, offers unique opportunities for self-analysis through redefining one’s  relationship to literature. The point is exemplified through a case-study of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.
Keywords: mesearch, adaptation, pedagogy, Gothic fiction
 
Lisa Morrow
Freelance writer

Abstract & Keywords

This paper unpacks the ideas in the poem “Pull Down My Statues” by Süleyman Apaydın, to examine some common descriptors in use about modern Turkey. Taking his inspiration from Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the founder of the modern Turkish republic, Apaydın ponders the success of Atatürk’s vision, based on the idea of a secular/sacred divide. Combining this with the way travel in Turkey is heavily promoted using the same themes, I explore how this divide, with its underlying connotations of West versus East and modernity versus tradition (as found in Turkey’s Ottoman past), is applied to Turkish identity. Turks are commonly portrayed as a homogenous people only differentiated by their degree of religiosity, but I argue that this analysis is too simplistic. Turkish identity has never been based on a single clear cut model, and this is becoming obvious as more traditional Islamic ways of life are being reworked by new forms of Islam based on capitalism. Consequently, although it is important to acknowledge Turkey’s past, looking to history for a way to steer through the complexities of the present is no longer useful or even relevant.
Keywords: Suleyman Apaydin, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, sacred secular divide, Turkishness, Turkish identity
 
INTERVIEWS
 
Jarrod Bolin, interviewed by Laurence Raw
 
Jillian St. Jacques, interviewed by Laurence Raw
 
Contributors - p. 60