Linguaculture, Volume 7, Number 2, 2016

Issue Editor: Teodora Ghivirigă
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
Teodora Ghivirigă
 
Lance Hewson
University of Geneva, Switzerland

Abstract & Keywords

The first part of this paper looks at how creativity has been explored in writings in the field of translation studies. It examines the stages in creative translation and investigates the creative process. The second part of the paper looks at how creativity can be exploited in the translation class by concentrating in particular on the liberating role of intralingual and interlingual paraphrase, while considering the various constraints operating on the selection of the optimal target text.
Keywords: conscious and semi-automatic translation, translation difficulties, intralingual and interlingual paraphrase, translational norms, translator training
 
Adriano Ferraresi
University of Bologna, Italy

Abstract & Keywords

This contribution focuses on didactic applications of intermodal corpora, i.e. corpora featuring interpreted and translated language. It relies on EPTIC, a multiple-translation and intermodal parallel corpus containing EU Parliament plenary speeches in Italian and English. The peculiar nature of EPTIC allows the investigation of a set of translational alternatives which are distinguished by modality- and task-based constraints (written vs. oral, translated vs. interpreted). To exemplify the potential of such corpus evidence, teaching activities focusing on collocations are proposed that encourage students to reflect on the decision-making processes involved in the slower-paced, reflective task of translation, vs. the faster, more automatic one of interpreting. A method is also described that can facilitate the selection of relevant didactic examples.
Keywords: multiple translation corpora, intermodal corpora, collocations, corpus-based teaching materials
 
Sorina Postolea, Teodora Ghivirigă
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania

Abstract & Keywords

The research devoted to special languages as well as the activities carried out in specialized translation classes tend to focus primarily on one-word or multi-word terminological units. However, a very important part in the making of specialist registers and texts is played by specialised collocations, i.e. relatively stable word combinations that do not designate concepts but are nevertheless of frequent use in a given field of activity. This is why helping students acquire competences relative to the identification and processing of collocations should become an important objective in specialised translation classes. An easily accessible and dependable resource that may be successfully used to this purpose is represented by corpora and corpus analysis tools, whose usefulness in translator training has been highlighted by numerous studies. This article proposes a series of practical, task-based activities—developed with the help of a small-size parallel corpus of specialised texts—that aim to raise the translation trainees’ awareness of the collocations present in specialised texts and to provide suggestions about their processing in translation.
Keywords: collocation, phraseology, specialised translation, translator training, parallel corpora, classroom activities for translators, translation pedagogy
 
Sigita Rackevičienė, Giedrė Valūnaitė Oleškevičienė, Gabrielė Galkutė
Mykolas Romeris University, Vilnius, Lithuania

Abstract & Keywords

Prompted by globalization and the importance of international communication in the legal sphere, legal language acquires an increasing importance. Contract law draws special attention in the EU and worldwide, and raises a demand for harmonization of the legal terminology of different languages and legal systems. Contracts in Anglo-Saxon and Lithuanian law have similar basic elements; however, they also contain significant differences which are determined by the regulations of the legal systems in which contracts are formed. The terminology used in the contracts also presents important peculiarities. The article focuses on the terminology of lease and tenancy agreements and provides results of the contrastive semantic analysis, the aim of which is to establish the degree of equivalence of the collected English terms and their Lithuanian counterparts. All investigated English terms have synonyms, which makes the task even more complex, as most of such synonyms have certain semantic differences and may be used interchangeably only in certain contexts. The findings of the research are believed to be valuable to legal translators, as well as compilers of legal dictionaries and databases.
Keywords: legal terminology, legal concepts, lease and tenancy agreements, contrastive analysis, equivalence