The Legitimacy of Intersections. Exploring Identity and Personal Truths in Letty Cottin-Pogrebin’s "Deborah, Golda, and Me. Being Female and Jewish in America"

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Ștefana Iosif

Abstract

Letty Cottin-Pogrebin’s autobiography, Deborah, Golda, and Me. Being Female and Jewish in America, immerses the reader into the intersectional world of feminist writing. Pogrebin allows for different genres to cohabitate and create a deeply personal account. At times almost journalistic, at others taking the guise of persuasive activist essays, the work itself mirrors in its shape the theme at its very center: the exploration of identity, done outside of prescribed lines, in the three-dimensionality conferred by multi-faceted sides of the self. As such, Pogrebin brings under one roof former opposites, allowing them to meld together: feminism and religious observance; the personal and the political; motherhood and fatherhood. Identity is not an either/or endeavor, and Pogrebin makes the case for embracing hyphenation and the liberating force of self-definition.

Article Details

How to Cite
Iosif, Ștefana. “The Legitimacy of Intersections. Exploring Identity and Personal Truths in Letty Cottin-Pogrebin’s ‘Deborah, Golda, and Me. Being Female and Jewish in America’”. Linguaculture, vol. 12, no. 1, June 2021, pp. 47-62, doi:10.47743/lincu-2021-1-0186.
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Articles
Author Biography

Ștefana Iosif, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iași, Romania

ȘTEFANA IOSIF has just defended her PhD thesis at the Doctoral School of Philological Studies of Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iași, having conducted research focused on Jewish-American autobiographical writings. Additionally, she is an associate teaching assistant at the university level, with classes varying from Interculturality and American Political Institutions, to Grammar and Medical Translations. She is an avid feminist and humanist, taking a special interest in social and cultural issues. Her ancestry is mostly of Romanian descent, and one of her aspirations is to trace her lineage as far back as documents would allow.

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